October 2015

Guilt-Free Leadership

No comments

Morning Morning Message imageLeadership requires taking chances and making on-the-spot decisions. Often, leaders make the right choice. Sometimes, they blunder.

Francis made such a blunder. In rebuilding his recruiting team, he hired not just one, but two people who ended up being bad hires. Making matters worse, several people, including his boss, advised against hiring them.

Filled with guilt, he ruminated over his “stupid” mistake. This triggered the story-telling mechanisms of his brain to make up frightening yarns as to all the negative impacts this would have. Stephen King himself couldn’t have written a better tale of horror.

The good news was this only went on for a few minutes as he realized that shaming himself wasn’t solving the problem. Instead, he did the next right thing, cleaning up the mistake.

We’re all going to screw up. When this happens, we simply must accept our mistakes, fix what we can, learn what we can, and move on. Guilt is optional.

Mistakes will kill you, if you let them. They can murder serenity, decapitate self-confidence, and eviscerate self-esteem. Every mistake is an opportunity to practice guilt-free leadership.

This gives a whole new meaning to “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.”

Scott WintripGuilt-Free Leadership
read more

Is Your Hiring Technology Making You Fat?

No comments

No one likes to be called fat. Unfortunately, technology is often bloating the hiring process, making it not just fat, but slow. In this podcast, you’ll hear how to select technology that cuts the “calories.”

Scott WintripIs Your Hiring Technology Making You Fat?
read more

The Disloyalty of Customers

2 comments

Scott's Monday Morning MessageThere’s an “affair” going on and it’s not just a tacky television series on the Showtime network.

Thousands of people are deemed unfaithful every day, including:

  • Hiring managers who circumvent their corporate recruiters.
  • Managers who work with a staffing vendor not on the approved list.
  • HR leaders who agree to work exclusively with one recruiting firm, yet, still give business to others.

Why does this happen? A human resources executive in Kansas City, Missouri recently said:

“I have a rolodex of ten agencies. One is our preferred staffing vendor; the other nine our backups. If the first one can’t fill the job today, I call the rest. The next one that appears able to fill it gets my business. I know I’m not alone in this. My colleagues tell me they do the same thing.”

Faithful business relationships are a two-way street. On the recruiting side, this means continuing to deliver quality and increasing the speed of delivery. 

If you don’t deliver fast and accurate hires, chances are that your customers are glancing over their shoulders. They’re looking for a more attractive partner who better meets their needs. 

Scott WintripThe Disloyalty of Customers
read more

The Future is Talent Sufficiency, Not Talent Scarcity

No comments

Scott's Monday Morning MessageThe CEO of Uber recently posed one of the most important questions leaders can ask about their own organizations.

Appearing during the first week of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Travis Kalanick was asked about the future of Uber. He focused on Uber Eats, an on-demand food delivery service being quietly rolled out in select cities.

Colbert, in his patently playful manner, acted as though he didn’t understand. How could Uber effectively stockpile fresh food for delivery?

After a few rounds of Colbert jabbing and Kalanick trying to explain, the Uber CEO said:

“Do you want to be part of the future or resist the future?”

Being part of the future has made Kalanick a thought leader. Instead of responding to trends, his company and other innovators (such as Apple, Tesla, and Amazon) are defining the future, right now.

Kalanick’s question, in the context of hiring, warrants time and attention:

Is your company part of the future of hiring or resisting the future?

Here are two important considerations as you ponder this question:

The Future Is About Sufficiency, Not Scarcity

There are two types of companies when it comes hiring—those that are focused on a shortage of talent and others that believe there is enough. Which one is right? Actually, both.

Focus defines strategy.

Leaders who are focused on scarcity pay more attention to the reports and statistics that prove there are shortages of talent. They create strategies that operate from a belief that there aren’t enough people to fill their jobs. Their teams can often be seen scrambling for talent, never seeming to find enough.

The leaders who focus on talent sufficiency are having a different workforce experience. They know there are more qualified people than they’ll ever need to fill their open jobs. By building a strategy that focuses on talent sufficiency, these leaders and their companies dissolve the smoke and break the mirrors. Instead of scrambling to fill seats that have been empty for weeks or even months, these companies fill jobs much more quickly.

The Future Is Fast and Only Getting Faster

Today, speed has become essential in many business transactions.

With regard to speed, Jimmy John’s, for instance, touts “freaky fast delivery.” The restaurant takes an order by phone or app, makes the sandwich, and delivers it to your office in minutes. With Amazon Dash, products like Tide and Gatorade show up at your house the same day you order them. On iTunes, you can watch movies that are currently playing in theaters.

The rise of the on-demand economy is permeating commerce and culture. Regardless of what’s being delivered, the underlying on-demand process remains the same. It is this process, when applied to hiring, that allows companies to hire with speed and accuracy.

In a wide variety of industries, including finance, healthcare, technology, staffing, and manufacturing, organizations that implement an on-demand process are dramatically decreasing time-to-fill.

 

The future has yet to be written. Which is why you can choose, right now, your focus. Sufficiency or scarcity, fast or slow—these are two of the important choices that will impact recruiting and hiring strategies and their results for years to come.

 

Scott WintripThe Future is Talent Sufficiency, Not Talent Scarcity
read more