September 2015

Why Recruiters on Your Team Aren’t Listening

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageLeaders are often frustrated that they have to repeat themselves. Are the recruiters and other staff members on their team not listening?

No, often, they are not.

Short attention spans have gotten shorter. We have just nine seconds to capture someone’s attention. And only 30 seconds to share our full message being tuned out.

Less is more when it comes to being masterful in conversations. Being a “soundbiter” will have more of your direct reports listening, wanting to understand, and retain the valuable things you have to say.

Becoming an effective soundbiter begins with three simple steps:

Step 1 – Listen to how people communicate in person, on the telephone, and via television and radio. Pay particular attention to those that capture your attention while keeping their comments brief. Notice how they convey their ideas through their selection of words and use of volume, tone, and inflection.

Step 2 – Conduct a personal debrief after conversations you have with others. Pick statements you made during the conversation and develop alternative ways you could have made your remarks in more of a provocative, soundbite fashion.

Step 3 – Strive for progress, not perfection, by using select conversations as an opportunity to practice saying more with less words. Personal conversations are often a safe and easy place to start.

The job of being a leader is challenging. Leaders make it harder than it needs to be when they talk to much.

Scott WintripWhy Recruiters on Your Team Aren’t Listening
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Turking for Talent

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageWhile Miley Cyrus made a similar sounding word famous for all the wrong reasons, Talent Turking is a different set of moves that allows companies to reduce their Labor Factor, the amount of time and effort necessary to generate viable candidates and fill jobs. Decreasing the Labor Factor is a key move in achieving Lean Recruiting—increasing the speed and accuracy of hiring by maximizing efficiency.

As described in Wikipedia, the Turk (or Mechnical Turk) was a “fake chess-playing machine constructed in the late 18th century.” Rather than being driven by some form of special technology, it was “a mechanical illusion that allowed a human chess master hiding inside to operate the machine. The Turk won most of the games played during its demonstrations around Europe and the Americas”

Even though this was an innovation only in spirit, one of the great innovators of our decade, Amazon, has taken this concept and made it real. Their website, www.mturk.com, allows you to hire “Mechanical Turk Workers,” real people who do tasks with machine like speed and cost efficiency.

For anyone involved in recruiting, talent acquisition, or staffing, the applications of this idea are endless. From research to sourcing to database cleanup, these and many more possibilities await, yet, very few people seem to be leveraging this resource.

Keyword searches produced the following results:

  • Recruiting – 0 results
  • Sourcing – 0 results
  • Candidate – 2 results
  • Job – 25 results (with only a handful being relevant to hiring)

By turking tasks, more time can be better spent talking with candidates and filling jobs. Even Miley would have to admit that this is the right kind of move for anyone wanting to operate more efficiently.

 

Amazon Mechanical Turk

Scott WintripTurking for Talent
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