January 2015

Shut Up and Sell

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageIn just two minutes the salesperson had gotten the client to say “yes” to giving his firm a shot at filling their needs. Had he stopped there, all would have been right and good in his world. Unfortunately, he continued to talk, extolling the features and benefits of the staffing services provided by his company. The “yes” turned into a “no” after the customer recanted, deciding to take time to think over his decision. Now that customer is buying from another firm, one I suspect whose salesperson didn’t kill an affirmative decision.

Often, salespeople don’t know when to shut up, especially when they’re focused on what they plan to say instead of hearing what the customer needs to share. Instead of deals that are done, their over-sharing causes business opportunities to come undone.

Selling is not telling, and even though many salespeople will say they know this, they keep talking anyways. When we shut up and sell we ask first, listen second, and only comment briefly (nine seconds or less is the rule) once we thoroughly understand what the customer needs and wants.

Shutting up may not be the most exciting way to sell, but the results it achieves are exhilarating.

Scott WintripShut Up and Sell
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The Dream

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageI have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Having a dream is a powerful thing. So proved Dr. King in the life he lived and in the words he shared as an American civil rights activist. Dreams, based upon deep convictions and core beliefs, can be the basis of tremendous good in both personal and professional situations.

What is the creed, the set of beliefs, that guides your organization? How is that being demonstrated day by day? Which aspects of your business are in conflict with that creed? What will rectify that? How will you ensure that the value you provide remains in line with all that you believe?

On this American holiday celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. King, may we all live our dreams, especially those that make the lives and the circumstances of those around us better each day.

Scott WintripThe Dream
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The Rush to Judgment

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageHow easy it is to apply previous experience to current circumstances. Such was the case when I emailed colleagues last week about a trip to New York I was on as a chaperone for my son’s thespian troupe. I received responses like:

  • “Ugh, teenagers. Good luck.”
  • “How’d you get roped into that?”
  • “Better you than me!”

This trip was one of the most enjoyable in all my travels across the globe. And my time with these teenagers was filled with laughter, fun, and ease. Had I rushed to judgment when I was asked to attend, I’d have missed out on a once in a lifetime experience with an amazing group of kids.

I’ve heard it said that we determine how we feel about people we meet in the first seven seconds. In addition, the relational nature of our brains immediately compares what’s in front of us to our past experiences. Instead of rushing to judgment, I suggest we all rush to openness, allowing relationships to unfold and situations to develop without undue influence of our internal filters. The buyer, candidate or individual we are dealing with may just be part of a once in a lifetime opportunity if we just get out of our own way.

__________

Join me this Tuesday for the Inspired Recruiting Program
Some interactions with candidates almost seem to be divinely inspired, while others feel like you’re trudging through mud and muck-getting nowhere fast. What’s the cause of these very different scenarios? Learn more

Scott WintripThe Rush to Judgment
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Why Nice Doesn’t Have to be Naughty in the New Year

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting done what matters most.

In December of each year, the words “naughty” and “nice” are often mentioned, especially when parents are reminding their children that Santa Claus has a list with these labels. While being on the “nice” side of the list may get a tot more presents, it frequently causes leaders unwanted headaches.

There’s nothing wrong with being nice, and it’s a huge asset in most situations. Building relationships with customers and forging new ones with prospects requires some degree of niceness or the ability to fake nice really well. And I believe that most people aren’t faking.

Being a nice person becomes a liability for leaders when they engage in Employee Neglect, the workplace equivalent of child neglect. Employee Neglect occurs when leaders:

  • Are not consistently holding team members accountable.
  • Justify or make excuses when expectations are not being met.
  • Delay or avoid reprimands or terminations that are prudent and necessary.

Engaging in Employee Neglect keeps people from reaching their true potential and hampers their ability to make a full contribution in jobs. Yet, managers are often inconsistent in requiring employees to consistently meet or exceed their quotas and commitments. Why? It does not feel nice to hold someone else accountable.

Nice Person Syndrome is cunning, common, and contagious since, in the moment, avoiding the discomfort of holding someone accountable feels much more comfortable. Yet, this comes back to bite everyone involved-the employee is not on track, the authority of the leader is undermined, and the company is not getting what it paid for.

So, what’s a nice guy, or gal, to do? You can’t turn off being a nice person, nor should you. The first thought of a nice person, more often than not, will almost always focus on all the reasons to avoid accountability conversations. So be it. You are not responsible for your first thought; you simply must take the next right action. Changing your thinking is difficult, if not impossible. However, we are in complete control of the choices we make and the actions we take.

Being nice isn’t naughty, as long as leaders remember that the nicest thing they can do is to firmly hold people responsible for getting done what matters most.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: When you find yourself hesitating, especially when it comes to holding someone accountable, ask yourself, “What is the next right thing that I should do?” Then, take that action immediately before your thinking gets in the way.


Join me for the Inspired Recruiting Program
Some interactions with candidates almost seem to be divinely inspired, while others feel like you’re trudging through mud and muck-getting nowhere fast. What’s the cause of these very different scenarios? Learn more

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Scott WintripWhy Nice Doesn’t Have to be Naughty in the New Year
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Professional Sportsmanship

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageWatching the Florida State football team lose to Oregon on New Year’s Day was not shocking nor disappointing, given the impressive performance of the Ducks. What was disheartening was the poor sportsmanship displayed by both teams; many of the Seminoles headed to the locker room instead of shaking hands with the victors, and several Oregon team members openly mocked Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston and the accusation of sexual assault that has followed him for the past year.

Situations such as these are unfortunate and avoidable, requiring only that the teams and their leaders make different choices. We each have this choice every day, as we can elect to compete with pride instead of engaging in practices that undermine the integrity of our industry. This includes…

…sharing value versus making negative statements about competitors.

…focusing conversations on ROI instead of attempting to compete on price.

…making commitments that can be met or exceeded instead of over-promising and under-delivering.

As we begin the year, my hope is that firms across the globe will rally to land more market share while winning more of the hearts and minds of buyers. As long as we engage in professional sportsmanship, there’s no valid reason why the vast majority of decision-makers can’t be raving fans of the value, flexibility, and responsiveness delivered by staffing and recruitment services.

Scott WintripProfessional Sportsmanship
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