May 2014

The Most Important Question for Sales Leaders – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Day

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Sales leaders often spend generous quantities of time reviewing progress, running meetings, and responding to emails. The most critical task, regularly revisiting the most important question, is often overlooked or completely neglected.

That question is:

“Would I want to be sold to like that?”

Most sales leaders, when they set aside their natural bias about what their salespeople sell, openly admit that the selling experience delivered by many on their team is some degree of undesirable. Descriptors like “pushy,” “overbearing,” and “controlling,” often come to mind when leaders honestly assess how their organization sells.

Selling shouldn’t be something buyers have to put up with; instead, it can become an experience they welcome and enjoy. This doesn’t just happen organically, especially since many salespeople have the gift for gab and the tendency to coerce and control.

Sales leaders who guide their teams to create buying experiences that even they themselves would want to be a part of are creating the most profitable and sustainable companies. They’re taking the “yuk” out of selling just by answering and acting on the most important question.

Scott WintripThe Most Important Question for Sales Leaders – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Day
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Getting Out of Your Own Way

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

Ever notice that some people seem to effortlessly get things done while others struggle? Are those that do this smarter, better at their jobs, or more motivated? In some cases, one or more of these is a factor, however, the most important element is self-command. Those with better self-command achieve more with less effort, staying out of their own way in the process.

What is self-command and how do you achieve it? Just like a vocal performer learns how to take care of her instrument, in this case her body, each of us must continually work on mastering how we use what we have control over. Self-command is how well you manage your choices, your actions, and your words, as these are the only three things over which we each have complete autonomy.

The first step in improving self-command is to manage the factors that impede our ability to control these aspects of self. These are easily remembered as H-A-A-L-T:

  • Hungry
  • Angry
  • Anxious
  • Lonely
  • Tired

Any one of these factors keeps us from being completely present and fully tuned into our capabilities. By managing these factors through Radical Accountability for our self-care, we ensure that our instrument is ready and able to perform at any given moment.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Watch for the five factors in H-A-A-L-T. Pay attention to how one or more of these is negatively impacting your self-command. As you address the factor(s), notice how quickly your self-command improves, you stop being an obstacle, and your results improve.


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Scott WintripGetting Out of Your Own Way
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A Day for Heroes

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageHeroes come in all sizes, and each of us can approach our jobs and lives with a heroic mentality. Take this video of a man in China who saves a child from a two story fall. I suspect few would debate that this was a hero in action.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBHIiXwzZhE

Being a hero isn’t just for life and death matters; each of us has the chance to do this each day. By helping our customers eliminate problems before they occur or providing solutions that make issues quickly go away, we each have the chance to be a hero to someone, somewhere, if we just catch them before they fall or pick them up when they do.

While serving one’s country or being a first responder can easily be acknowledged as an incredible sacrifice, no sacrifice is required to be professionally and personally heroic each day. All it takes is attention and action, something that each of us can easily control.

To those of you in the United States, Happy Memorial Day. And for all that have served or do serve in the military or as a first responder, thank you for your service and for being a hero.

Scott WintripA Day for Heroes
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Email is Not a Form of Communication – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Day

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Effective communication is never one sided, but that’s exactly what you get with email. One person writes and transmits; the receivers read and reply. These monologues are never, ever effective dialogues as there is a time delay that allows too much room for misinterpretation, misunderstanding, and miscommunication. Email strips away not only the tone, and too often the context, from the message, but it also removes the very essence of efficient and effective human conversation.

Is email bad? Of course not; it’s just poorly used by too many people. Salespeople, leaders, customer service staff, recruiters, and, for that matter, anyone in business can breathe new life into their relationships by simply picking up the phone or meeting with someone for a brief dialogue.

Email is not a form or communication; it’s a means of transmission and documentation. We’d all do well to use it just for transmitting a contract or proposal, or sending one to two sentences, at most, to schedule a meeting or confirm a time for a call. Otherwise, let’s all have real conversations, versus the fakery that poses for one in our email inboxes.

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Scott WintripEmail is Not a Form of Communication – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Day
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Practice Makes Profit; Now That’s Perfect!

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

Radical Accountability is considered a practice as there is always an aspect of it that can be evolved, improved, or enhanced in some way. Practice makes profits, but never strives for perfection as that is a setup for failure. Perfection is highly over-rated as we are imperfect beings who don’t need to achieve anything near perfection in order to substantially improve results.

This is the first of the core tenets of Radical Accountability:

Radical Accountability promotes progress over perfection.

This practice of ongoing progress also includes the following core precepts:

  • Radical Accountability insists we tell our truth, even if we’re afraid it’ll piss someone off.
  • Radical Accountability requires that we be our character.
  • Radical Accountability compels us to confront ignorance that causes harm.
  • Radical Accountability abhors the addiction to multitasking, advocating single-tasking instead.
  • Radical Accountability balances work and life through healthy selfishness.
  • Radical Accountability demands compassion, especially towards ourselves.
  • Radical Accountability champions personal responsibility.
  • Radical Accountability mandates taking the shortest path, leaving the long road to sightseers.
  • Radical Accountability embraces simplicity, countering human tendencies towards complexity.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action:  Pick one of the ten tenets above and make it your action focus for the week.


How to avoid being a control freak while still remaining in control…this week on GAIN. Not a member? Lifetime memberships are on sale for just $29. Learn more.

Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here: https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

 

 

 

 

Scott WintripPractice Makes Profit; Now That’s Perfect!
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What Was the Question?

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageNext time someone asks you to repeat a question, count the number of words. Chances are it was more than ten. I’ve often noticed this happening with salespeople talking with prospects and clients and executives speaking with members of their team. What’s the issue? Our brains process questions of less than ten words much more effectively than those that exceed ten.

Each time we pose a question of more than ten words, the listener spends more time focusing on the question and less on their answer. Even if they don’t ask you to repeat the question, which often happens, he or she is still too focused on your question.

Questions using ten words or less are understood more quickly and answered more thoroughly. This generates lots of details, a richer conversation, and even more buy-in.

Our Sales Mantra in Sales Yoga reminds us to:

Say little, ask a lot.

As we ask lots of questions to understand the thoughts and needs of those around us, it benefits everyone if we use less words in questions, prompting the listener to give lots of details.

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How to avoid being a control freak while still remaining in control…this week on GAIN. Not a member? Lifetime memberships are on sale for just $29. Learn more

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Scott WintripWhat Was the Question?
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