May 2013

The Staffing Moment: Talent Manufacturing – Cloning Quality Candidates

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A way to legally clone great talent is by using adjacent alternatives. If you’re having a hard time finding just the right candidate with the obvious skills, try looking next door, and you may find that they have attributes that would fit the bill.

Scott WintripThe Staffing Moment: Talent Manufacturing – Cloning Quality Candidates
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Would You Want a Planned, Canned Response? – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Week

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Cans work well for beans and vegetables but fail miserably in sales. Yet, many sales organizations mandate that salespeople memorize or read specific soundbites designed for specific situations. Would you want to be on the receiving end of one of these impersonal, canned statements? This type of sales practice is just one of many reasons why people dislike hearing a sales pitch.

In Sales Yoga, we practice the art of Integrative Questioning to build rapport, develop understanding, and determine the value our customers require. This easy-to-use technique simply requires using all or a portion of a buyer’s response to keep the conversation moving forward.

A typical conversation using Integrative Questions goes something like this:

“Mrs. Buyer, why where you interested in meeting with me today?”

“Joe Smith had good things to say about you. We’re pretty happy with our current vendor, but we’re always open to new possibilities.”

“What would make you happier?”

“Well, that’s a good question. One thing is that it would be great if we could get what we need faster.”

“How much faster?”

“Right now, it takes four or five days. One to two days would be great.”

“What impact would getting what you need in one to two days have on your business?”

“Wow! I hadn’t really thought about that. I’m sure it would save us not just those extra days, but also some money.”

“How much money?

“Gee, if I had to guess, at least a few thousand dollars a week.”

“So if I can deliver what you need in one to two days, are you ready to start saving over $100,000 a year?”

“If you can show me a solution that does that, yes, I’m open to it.”

How could she not say “yes” to her own idea of something that would make her happier?

And no cans required!

Learn how to become a Sales Yogi.

Scott WintripWould You Want a Planned, Canned Response? – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Week
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Take No Prisoners – Issue 2 – The Multi-Tasking Myth

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here:
https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

The Multi-Tasking Myth

Glancing through the window, you see someone behaving erratically, shifting focus from one thing to another every ten to fifteen seconds. This goes on as you continue to watch … ten seconds focused here, the next ten somewhere else. After 30 minutes, you watch her shoulders slump followed by a momentary sigh before she dives back in to her seemingly awkward routine.

If you’re thinking this is someone with ADD or ADHD, think again. This is a pattern of behavior of millions of people engaging in a routine often referred to as multi-tasking.

Multi-tasking is a myth, as we are incapable of effectively doing more than one thing at a time. Some may dismiss this, but take a moment to observe someone who claims to be multi-tasking. Watch long enough, and you’ll see that the individual may move from one thing to another every few seconds, but at no point in time is he or she really doing multiple things at once.&nbsp ;

By promoting multi-tasking as a desirable work trait, companies have infected their cultures with the workplace equivalent of ADHD, Corporate ADD (Attention Divided Dilemma). Instead of giving their full attention to what’s in front of them, employees suffering from Corporate ADD are constantly shifting gears while never gaining momentum. Work declines as important functions are incomplete, inaccurate, or of insufficient quality. Everyone suffers as customers receive distracted service, employees exhaust themselves, and managers are increasingly frustrated with the overwhelm of their responsibilities.

There is no medication for this version of ADD, nor is one required. The solution simply requires leaders to promote a healthy culture of work, including:

  1. Single-tasking, a dedicated focus on the task at hand.
  2. Maintaining boundaries to minimize distractions that are almost always less important than the task at hand.
  3. Avoiding drive-by leadership and, instead, meeting with employees once or twice daily to disseminate important information.

Radical Accountability requires us to be honest about what works, and what does not. Anything that truly matters deserves our full, undivided attention, not the distractedness that is perpetuated by Corporate ADD.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Pick single-tasking, better boundaries, or avoiding drive-by leadership as your initial focus and take action on implementing it this week.


View Scott’s upcoming speaking calendar.

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

Scott WintripTake No Prisoners – Issue 2 – The Multi-Tasking Myth
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Your Bias is Showing: Handling Gender, Racial and Social Biases

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By understanding what your biases are, you will be able to handle tough gender, racial or social issues. Ask questions to those individuals that you don’t clearly understand, so that you can move to a more positive, productive place and eliminate the biases that could potentially cause problems.

Scott WintripYour Bias is Showing: Handling Gender, Racial and Social Biases
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Your Radical Accountability Minute: Would You Like to be a Little Successful or a Lot?

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Being successful is not working harder, it’s about becoming who you want to be as a person.

Scott WintripYour Radical Accountability Minute: Would You Like to be a Little Successful or a Lot?
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Spontaneous Buying – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Week

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It’s a hot summer day with no perceptible breeze. Lying across the way is a haphazard pile of debris, having been blown into what almost looks like a small pyramid. A spotlight of sun, the size of a small flashlight beam, suddenly appears on the pile, having been channeled by a pane of window glass. Suddenly, a burst of flame erupts as the wood, grasses, and other assorted detritus catch fire.

Without the right elements in place, spontaneous combustion cannot happen, and the same applies to spontaneous buying. People don’t just wake up one day and suddenly select a random vendor for a purchase. A confluence of factors makes buying possible, with one of the most important being Brand Consciousness.

Unless your company really stinks at what you do, there are only three reasons why people aren’t buying:

  1. They don’t know you exist (Brand Unconsciousness).
  2. They’ve forgotten you exist (Brand Amnesia).
  3. They don’t yet understand your true value, especially as compared to your competitors (Brand Dubiety).

The job of a competent sales team is to overcome these factors. In Sales Yoga, we do this in a number of ways, including the three-part Attractive Persistence Plan:

  • Brief: Messages no longer than 30 seconds total. This includes a brief introduction, a compelling question or statement (such as a result you’ve recently achieved), and your contact information (repeated twice to ensure accuracy).
  • Polite: Do not bash the competition, chastise the prospect for not calling you back, or have an arrogant attitude or tone. Do call persistently, which for many people means about once each week.
  • Interesting: Make a different statement or ask a different question in each of your messages. Your questions and statements should be provocative; the kind of question or statement that would stick in someone’s mind. Your goal is to begin to deliver value from the very start, and that begins with leaving valuable, interesting messages.

While spontaneous combustion is undesirable, spontaneous buying is desirable and necessary to maintain a Sales Edge. Like pushing your body to the edge in physical yoga, Sales Edge creates a brand awareness that creates nonstop growth and perpetual profits.

Learn how to become a Sales Yogi.

Scott WintripSpontaneous Buying – Scott’s Sales Yoga Thought for the Week
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Avoid Driving Off the Road – How to Engage Rumble Strips for Individual and Team Improvement

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Rumble strips alert you that an adjustment needs to be made. Use this concept in your day to day activities, and you can assure that you will never be too far behind where you need to be.

Scott WintripAvoid Driving Off the Road – How to Engage Rumble Strips for Individual and Team Improvement
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Take No Prisoners – Issue 1 – Avoid Artwork Affliction

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here:
https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

Avoid Artwork Affliction

When’s the last time you really paid attention to the art or decorations at your home or office? Not just a quick glance, but really taking a moment to appreciate the beauty of a piece or remembering what attracted you to it in the first place. Most people admit that the only time they take notice is when someone asks them where they acquired a particular object OR its significance. Simply put, after a while everything blends in, even things that are especially meaningful to us. This is Artwork Affliction.

Smart product manufacturers understand this concept, which is why they change their packaging from time to time. Last year, I remember seeing a Pepsi can that had the colors of a Coca Cola product. Just above the Pepsi label were the words “Great new look. Same great taste.” Did they new packaging work? Well, it got my attention enough to mention it here.

Artwork Affliction happens every day in corporations across the globe, and it’s not only the art that’s being overlooked. Those signs espousing your customer service best practices haven’t been noticed in months. The sales process document that you ask people to keep on their desks is collecting dust. Even the main page of your intranet barely gets a notice even though the content may change from time to time.

Radical Accountability, an unwavering responsibility for getting done what matters most, includes a number of methods that eliminate the need for heavy-handed leadership. Leaders all too often have to remind people to do the very things noted on the wall, sales process document, or computer screen because of Artwork Affliction. When leaders do this in the most positive way, it still can feel like micromanagement even though people haven’t been paying attention.

The cure for Artwork Affliction is relatively simple: change the look, location, or liability. You can alter the design, color, or formatting — the look. Moving the location, just like moving furniture, often recaptures attention. To shift the liability, delegate responsibility to team members for regularly modifying the look or location of key totems of workplace significance.

You’ve worked hard to build a company with processes and systems that drive your business. By avoiding Artwork Affliction, you’ll have your best practices doing what they are supposed to do.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Elect one or two important processes or reminders and change the look, location or liability.


Learn how to engage Radical Accountability while saving 20% through Friday, May 24th (use code TNP1).

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

Scott WintripTake No Prisoners – Issue 1 – Avoid Artwork Affliction
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